Reblog: What is Gap Trading?


Forex Gap Trading

When trading, one cannot overstate the importance of gaps.

Gaps refer to areas on a chart where the price of a currency or stock moves sharply up or down with little or no trading in between. As this area represents an abnormality in the normal price pattern of the stock / instrument, it gets referred to as a gap.

So of what use can a gap be to an investor? Because the tiny area represents a fluctuation in the pricing, a trader can potentially exploit the gap and make a profit.

Gaps occur as a result of underlying fundamental / technical factors that vary for each stock or instrument and require monitoring and knowledge by the investor.

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Reblog: Inverted Cup and Handle Pattern: A Bearish Technical Trading Indicator


Inverted cup and handle patterns can be identified by their large crescent shape followed by a less extreme, upward retracement. The entire pattern usually takes within 3 to 6 month to develop. These patterns are meant to serve as being indicative of a bearish reversal.

Below is a chart of the EUR|USD foreign currency pair showing an example of an inverted cup and handle pattern:

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Reblog: 10 Things You Need To Know About Risk, Risk Management And Trading


I will start this piece by saying that I am not bullish or bearish, I don’t make market calls, or predictions and I don’t have opinions about the markets that I trade. I just follow my process, which is based on risk management, money management, price and moving averages. I lead off with this statement so that readers do not think that I am making some type of a market call by talking about risk management and downside protection while we are at all-time highs. I follow core concepts:

Respect price, respect risk and always be prepared for any outcome. 

With Global markets at or near all-time highs, and the money flowing in for many, now seemed to be an opportune time to remind ourselves that every day is a good day to focus on risk management. All of the greatest traders, Soros, Druckenmiller, Tudor Jones and Kovner, to name just a few, have a laser-like focus on capital preservation and risk management. They have all publicly stated that risk management and their ability to cut losses short is the cornerstone of their success. Paul Tudor Jones, a Billionaire Trader, is frequently the most quoted and has said:

“…at the end of the day, the most important thing is how good are you at risk control. Ninety-percent of any great trader is going to be the risk control.”

“Don’t focus on making money; focus on protecting what you have.”

“I am always thinking about losing money as opposed to making money.”

Bruce Kovner, another Billionaire Trader, said in Market Wizards: “First, I would say that risk management is the most important thing to be well understood”.

With that being said, here are 10 key concepts regarding risk management that I focus on:

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Reblog: Trading Rules From Amos Hostetter


Amos Hostetter cofounded Commodities Corporation (otherwise known as CC) along with Helmut Weymar back in 1969. CC is the trading shop that produced more legendary trading talent than the Yankees have All-Stars. Alumni include Bruce Kovner, Michael Marcus, Paul Tudor Jones, Ed Seykota and more…

Hostetter was considered the wise sage and mentor of the group. He’s credited with imbuing many of these trading greats with the wisdom and knowledge they used to achieve their grand heights.

Upon his untimely death in a car accident in 1977, the directors of CC commissioned one of their traders, Morris Markovitz, to gather and record Hostetter’s timeless philosophy on markets and trading. The goal was to ensure future CC traders could benefit from his invaluable teachings. The resulting work was an internal booklet titled Amos Hostetter; A Successful Speculator’s Approach to Commodities Trading.

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Reblog: Richard Rhodes 18 Trading Rules


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I must admit, I am not smart enough to have devised these ridiculously simple trading rules. A great trader gave them to me some 15 years ago. However, I will tell you, they work. If you follow these rules, breaking them as infrequently as possible, you will make money year in and year out, some years better than others, some years worse – but you will make money. The rules are simple. Adherence to the rules is difficult.

“Old Rules…but Very Good Rules”

If I’ve learned anything in my decades of trading, I’ve learned that the simple methods work best. Those who need to rely upon complex stochastics, linear weighted moving averages, smoothing techniques, Fibonacci numbers etc., usually find that they have so many things rolling around in their heads that they cannot make a rational decision. One technique says buy; another says sell. Another says sit tight while another says add to the trade. It sounds like a cliche, but simple methods work best.

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Reblog: Profitable Trading Explained


If you have a winning system with the right risk management you can still fail to be profitable if you do not have the right trading psychology to trade it with discipline.

If you have a winning system with the right trading psychology you can still fail to be profitable by blowing up during a losing streak without the right position sizing and risk management.

If you have the right risk management and trading psychology you can still fail to be profitable because you are trading with no edge because you don’t have a winning trading system.

Profitable trading requires three dynamics: a winning price action trading system with an edge, proper position sizing with risk management, along with the right trading psychology to allow you to trade your process with discipline.

The original post is authored by Steve Burns of newtraderu.com and is available here.


Reblog: A Trading Career – The Path To Profitable Trading And When To Make Money


Today I want to talk about a topic that could turn a lot of losing traders into profitable and professional traders. In our pro forum, I keep coming back to this topic quite often because I know about the importance and in the pro area, we have now seen many times that traders who follow this way of thinking, have a better chance of becoming profitable.

Learning vs. making money

I completely understand that this will be a tough pill to swallow but I always think that being honest and having realistic expectations is a key to trading success.

In trading, there is a time to make money and there is a time to study and work on yourself. When you are just starting out, you should not focus on making money and you have to completely detach yourself from the belief that you’ll earn a great living anytime soon.

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Reblog: Trading Limits – You Have to Start Thinking about the money


trading limits

Good traders are known to be masters of risk management. Risk management includes following a detailed trading plan, setting stop and limit orders and managing traders without succumbing to emotions.

Good traders also tend to follow a robust trading plan that focuses more on ensuring that the traders do not lose their capital, while the profits are seen as only secondary. As part of this pursuit in achieving trading excellence, professional and seasoned traders follow the concept of setting limits on their losses, on a daily, weekly and even monthly basis.

Trading with limits ensures that the traders do not end up sabotaging themselves in the heat of the moment as emotions can often override logic when a trade turns into a loss.

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Reblog: 20 Reasons Why 90% of New Traders Don’t Make It


  1. They risk too much to try to make so little.
  2. They trade with the probabilities against them.
  3. They think trading is easy money.
  4. Instead of focusing on learning how to trade they focus on getting rich.
  5. They blow up due to improper position sizing.
  6. With no understanding of the mathematical risk of ruin they are doomed after the first long string of losing trades.
  7. Blindly following a guru that leads them down the road of destruction.
  8. They don’t do their homework.
  9. They trade opinions not robust systems.
  10. They go looking for ‘trades’ instead of a methodology.
  11. They have no trading plan.
  12. They attempt to piggy back on the trades another trader but don’t understand the risks.
  13. Most new traders quit when they realized how much work is involved in trading successfully.
  14. Most traders quit when they learn how many losing trades they will have to have to get to the winners.
  15. New traders quit if they do not have a passion for trading itself.
  16. Many new traders will give up the moment they realize that trading does not have guaranteed income, you are an entrepreneur.
  17. They are not willing to pay the tuition to learn to trade in time, study, and losing trades.
  18. They are crushed by the learning curve that they do not work hard enough to get through.
  19. We lose a lot of new traders when they realize that trading is actually harder than their job.
  20. The traders that don’t make it quit when they were tired, frustrated, and stressed out, the winning traders quit after they had figured trading out.

The original article appears on newtraderu.com and is penned by Steve Burns. It can be accessed here.


Reblog: 25 Powerful Trading Lessons From Jesse Livermore


jesse livermore

Born in 1877, Jesse Livermore is possibly the most famous trader in history.

He started trading at the age of 14 from bucket shops. His tape reading skill was so good that these bucket shops eventually didn’t want to do business with him.

At his peak in 1929, he was worth $100 million. Ultimately, he lost his entire fortune when he broke his trading rules.

The same trading rules which made him millions, caused him to lose everything when he lost control of himself.

Still, there are valuable lessons to be learned from Jesse Livermore’s trading experience.

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