Reblog: Charlie Munger on Getting Rich, Wisdom, Focus, Fake Knowledge and More


“In the chronicles of American financial history,” writes David Clark in The Tao of Charlie Munger: A Compilation of Quotes from Berkshire Hathaway’s Vice Chairman on Life, Business, and the Pursuit of Wealth, “Charlie Munger will be seen as the proverbial enigma wrapped in a paradox—he is both a mystery and a contradiction at the same time.”

On one hand, Munger received an elite education and it shows: He went to Cal Tech to train as a meteorologist for the Second World War and then attended Harvard Law School and eventually opened his own law firm. That part of his success makes sense.

Yet here’s a man who never took a single course in economics, business, marketing, finance, psychology, or accounting, and managed to become one of the greatest, most admired, and most honorable businessmen of our age. He was noted by essentially all observers for the originality of his thoughts, especially about business and human behavior. You don’t learn that in law school, at Harvard or anywhere else.

Bill Gates said of him: “He is truly the broadest thinker I have ever encountered.” His business partner Warren Buffett put it another way: “He comes equipped for rationality… I would say that to try and typecast Charlie in terms of any other human that I can think of, no one would fit. He’s got his own mold.”

How does such an extreme result happen? How is such an original and unduly capable mind formed? In the case of Munger, it’s clearly a combination of unusual genetics and an unusual approach to learning and life.

Continue Reading


Reblog: The Secret Ingredient If You Want To Become A Full Time Trader – What Nobody Talks About


Looking back, I now realize that what allowed me to finally establish consistency into my trading was not a better trading strategy or a different method, but something I never expected when I started out as a trader.

In today’s society where the average attention span has dropped to 8 seconds, where 140 character tweets seem too long (#TLDR) and people skip YouTube videos after just a few seconds, we easily lose the connection to ourselves…

The concept of “self-awareness” has a woo woo ring to it and most traders will not listen to you if you start a trading conversation by referring to self-awareness. However, if you really want to make this work and if you want to finally realize your goal of becoming a pro trader, you have to listen and I am 100% certain that you will be able to relate to my story as well.

What is self-awareness? Forget the spiritual mumbo-jumbo

Unfortunately, most people, and especially traders who are often numbers driven and very rational, associate the term self-awareness with something spiritual and connect the wrong assumptions with it. This is very unfortunate because I have never met a successful trader who is not also very self-aware. You’ll see soon that self-awareness is something very different from what you believe it is.

Continue Reading


Reblog: Ten Signs You Are Probably A Terrible Trader


Over 90% over traders will end up losing money in the stock market. Chances are if you are reading this you are probably loser in the Market. In order to encourage you to quit before you lose all your money, I created a list below to make you realize you are terrible at trading and should probably find another dream to pursue.

  1. You follow “professional” traders on twitter. The truth is many on twitter are complete phonies and have built a fake trading persona to end up selling you something in the end. More on this can be found on my guide on how to identify fraud traders.
  2. You look at inspirational quotes or quotes given by “famous” traders as part of your trading regimen. This is non-sense, this won’t help you.
  3. You assume psychology is a major part of trading, much more than an actual system. As such, you constantly remind yourself that you lost money in your last trade because of psychological mistakes and thus you refer to #2 on the list to regain focus (stupid trading quotes). If psychology was such a big part the simple solution would be to write programs that would trade for you (this isn’t a money maker). The truth is, many “professional” traders instill that psychology is big so that they can sell you their products for improving your “weak” psychology. Just to be clear I am sure most of you lack discipline, but even with discipline you still would lose money.
    Continue Reading

Reblog: Why you shouldn’t try to trade like George Soros


George Soros, founder of Soros Fund Management LLC

 

Traders tend to be overconfident and discount what they don’t know about the market and individual securities. They see patterns instead of random noise. And they have a hard time admitting their losses and focus too much on gains.

In summarizing the science of behavioral finance, Statman says we’re pretty much hard-wired to consistently make these mistakes — and lose money. Since we tend to think of ourselves as better than average on most everything from driving to investing, it clouds our rational judgment. A body of research has found this to be particularly true when it comes to amateur stock traders.

Statman said that average returns of frequent traders “lag those of infrequent traders and the average returns of infrequent traders lag average returns of investors who abstain from trading.”

Continue Reading


Reblog: Do NOT Look For a Trading Strategy That Suits Your Personality


What Feels Comfortable and Natural Usually Doesn’t Work

Why do almost all speculator lose money? They lose because successful speculation requires that we consistently do that which is psychologically uncomfortable and unnatural” – Richard Weissman

There is a persistent overall tendency for equity to flow from the many to the few. In the long run, the majority loses. The implication for the trader is that to win, you have to act like the minority. If you bring normal habits and tendencies to trading, you’ll gravitate toward the majority and inevitably lose” – William Eckhardt

Most of what we naturally do and think do not work in trading. Here are a couple of examples:

  • We are naturally inclined to cut our winners short and let our winners run

Continue Reading


Reblog: How to Cut Losses and Let Winners Run


Loss Aversion – Cut Losses Short & Let Winners Run

If you’ve been trading for a while, you’ve probably heard the following ubiquitous mantra of trading: “Cut Your Losses Short & Let Your Winners Run”.

Why Should You?

Stocks can literally go to zero. It happened many times before and will happen in the future, regardless of how big the company is.

MANY oil and coal companies recently filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy and their stocks got delisted. You may also remember Lehman Brother and General Motors. What happens when your stock falls off a cliff and gets delisted? You simply lose all the money you invested in that stock.

Continue Reading