Reblog: Morningstar: Value Investing: Patience Will Be Rewarded


Here’s a great article from Morningstar which discusses the importance of patience as a value investor. One of the key takeaways is:

“However, by anchoring investment decisions to value, we can navigate challenging circumstances and look through market noise and emotion to identify and take advantage of opportunities that may present in times of market stress. This often sees our views as contrarian to others in the market.”

Here’s an excerpt from the article:

It is difficult to know how long it will take for an attractively priced asset to appreciate towards its fair value, long-term investors must be prepared to wait.

Value investing has a prominent place in our investment process and is backed up by a vast body of empirical evidence that supports this approach to investing.

Perhaps it can be best described through illustration in the diagram below:

Continue Reading


Reblog: 39 Powerful Trading Tips by Ed Seykota That Will Rock Your Trading


ed seykota

Heard of Ed Seykota?

He was featured in the book Market Wizards and returned 250,000% over a 16 year period. Comparable to the likes of Warren Buffet and George Soros.

A little background:

Ed Seykota has an Electrical Engineering degree from MIT and is a systematic trend follower.

His trading is largely confined to the few minutes it takes to run his computer program, which generates signals for the next day.

If you want to get into the mind of one the best traders around, this is your chance.

Here are the 39 best things said by Ed Seykota.

Quotes by Ed Seykota

Technical analysis

1. In order of importance to me are: (1) the long-term trend, (2) the current chart pattern, and (3) picking a good spot to buy or sell. Those are the three primary components of my trading. Way down in very distant fourth place are my fundamental ideas and, quite likely, on balance, they have cost me money.

Continue Reading


Reblog: IPO Review – CreditAccess Grameen


IPO Snapshot:

CreditAccess Grameen Limited is entering the primary market on Wednesday, August 8, 2018, to raise upto Rs. 630 crore via fresh issue of equity shares of Rs. 10 each and an offer for sale (OFS) of upto 1.19 crore equity shares by promoter, both in the price band of Rs. 418 to Rs. 422 per share. Representing 18.70% of the post issue paid-up share capital, total issue size is Rs. 1,131 crore at the upper end of the price band, of which 44% is the OFS portion. The issue closes on Friday, August 10, 2018 and listing is likely on 23rd August.

Company Overview:

CreditAccess Grameen is India’s 3rd largest micro finance institution (MFI) providing unsecured loans to women with annual household income upto Rs.1.6 lakh (urban area) and Rs. 1 lakh (rural area), of average ticket size of Rs. 20,000. With asset under management (AUM) of Rs. 4,975 crore (31-3-18) and a deep rural focus (81% customers in rural), 86% of loans provided is for income generating activities, 10% for home improvement and balance for emergency and family welfare. Despite widespread network of 516 branches across 132 districts in 9 Indian States and Union territory, company’s AUM is concentrated in Karnataka (58% of total) and Maharashtra (27%). While other MFIs have converted to banks (Bandhan, Equitas, Ujjivan, Bharat Financial on the verge of merger with Indusind), CreditAccess does not plan to tap the banking route and is comfortable being a standalone MFI.

Continue Reading


Reblog: The Drawbacks of Behavioral Finance During a Market Correction


The stock market got interesting again this week. Volatility is back after having gone missing for the past 18 months or so.I saw the following words spewed across the financial media this week: turbulence, fear, pain, panic, distress, agony. It’s still a little early for all of that. As of the close on Thursday, the S&P 500 is a little over 10% from its all-time highs.But try telling that to your emotions when you’re witnessing a decent percentage of your savings evaporate over the course of a little more than a week. The pain we feel from losses dwarfs the pleasure we feel from gains.

Because of the havoc they can wreak on our portfolios, investment professionals and advisors often instruct their clients to ignore their emotions during times like this.

Continue Reading


Reblog: How to Tell a Stock Market Correction From a Crash


News that the Dow Jones Industrial Average is down several hundred points sends shivers down the spine of even the most weathered investor. Such drops, while infrequent, can be scary because it’s impossible to predict how severe or long-lasting losses will be. And even if you trust the market will eventually rebound (as it always has), it’s hard to watch the value of your investments shrink before your eyes.

In the immediate term, people will argue about what to call it — a crash? A correction? Leave the vernacular to others, and instead understand what’s causing the market to fall. This knowledge may not bring your money back right away, but it could help you prepare for the market’s next move up or take advantage of lower stock prices in the meantime.

Defining a drop in the stock market


Reblog : Warren Buffett – “It’s Not What You Look At That Matters; It’s What You See.”


Warren Buffett provides a great lesson for all investors in the book – The Warren Buffet Way, by Robert Hagstrom. The lesson is that investors can spend weeks and years reading and analyzing information on prospective companies, but according to Buffett, “It’s not what you look at that matters; it’s what you see.” The lesson learned by Buffett happened during his investigation of IBM back in 2011.

Here’s an excerpt from the book:

Buffett confessed that he came late to the IBM party. Like Coca-Cola in 1988 and Burlington Northern Santa-Fe in 2006, he had been reading the annual reports for 50 years before his epiphany. It arrived, he said, one Saturday in March 2011. Quoting Thoreau, Buffett says, “It’s not what you look at that matters; it ’s what you see.” Buffett admitted to CNBC that he had been “hit between the eyes” by the competitive advantages IBM possesses in finding and keeping clients.

The information technology (IT) services industry is a dynamic and global industry within the technology sector, and no one is bigger in this industry than IBM. Information technology is an $800 billion-plus market that covers a broad spectrum of services broken down into four different buckets: consulting, systems integration, IT outsourcing, and business process outsourcing.

The first two, combined, contribute 52 percent of IBM ’s revenues; 32 percent comes from IT outsourcing; and 16 percent from business process outsourcing. In the consulting and systems integration space, IBM is the number-one global provider—38 percent bigger than the next competitor, Accenture. In the IT outsourcing space, IBM is also the number-one global provider—78 percent larger than the next competitor, Hewlett-Packard. In business process outsourcing, IBM is the seventh-largest provider, behind Teleperformance, Atento, Convergys, Sitel, Aegis, and Genpact.

Continue Reading


Reblog: IPO Analysis: HDFC Asset Management Company (AMC) Limited


Verdict: A ‘no-brainer’ Buy

IPO Snapshot:

HDFC Asset Management Company (AMC) Limited is entering the primary market on Wednesday 25th July 2018, with an offer for sale (OFS) of up to 2.55 crore equity shares of Rs.5 each, by both the promoters, HDFC (34% of OFS) and UK’s Standard Life (66% of OFS), in the price band of Rs. 1,095 to Rs. 1,100 per share. Representing 12.01% of the post issue paid-up share capital, total issue size is Rs. 2,800 crore at the upper end of the price band. The issue closes on Friday 27th July and listing is likely on 6th August, which will be the 5th listing from HDFC stable.

Company Overview:

HDFC AMC, 56.97% subsidiary of HDFC Ltd, with foreign JV partner UK’s Standard Life owning 37.98% stake, is India’s second largest AMC (behind ICICI Prudential) with asset under management (AUMs) of Rs.2.91 lakh crore (31-3-18) and 13.7% market share. Company is the largest AMC with equity oriented funds (at 51.3% of AUM vis-à-vis industry average of 43.2%), which also helps it become the most profitable AMC in India, having earned net profit of Rs. 722 crore in FY18 or 18.1% market share of the industry PAT, due to higher fees earned in equity as against debt product. Thus, with only 13.7% market share in total AUM, 16.8% market share in actively managed equity-oriented AUM help the company garner 18.1% market share in net profits of the industry, comprising of 42 players. Besides high profitability, company also enjoys benefit of retailisation of portfolio, with 62% AUM coming from retail investors, unlike industry average of ~50%, again highest market share in retail AUM of 15.7%. Systematic investment plan (SIP) products, with average ticket size of Rs. 3,800, also provide high revenue visibility, as 77% of company’s SIPs are signed up for 5 years.

Continue Reading


Reblog: Risk Is Not High Math


Smead Capital Management letter to investors  titled,”Risk Is Not High Math.”

Dear fellow investors,

Long term success in common stock ownership is much more about patience and discipline than it is about mathematics. There is no better arena for discussing this truism than in how investors measure risk. It is the opinion of our firm that measuring a portfolio’s variability to an index is ridiculous, because it is impossible to beat the index without variability.

We believe that how you measure risk is at the heart of how well you do as a long-duration owner of better than average quality companies. In a recent interview, Warren Buffett explained that pension and other perpetuity investors are literally dooming themselves by owning bond investments that are guaranteed to produce a return well below the obligations they hope to meet.

Buffett defines investing as postponing the use of purchasing power today to have more purchasing power in the future. For that reason, we see the risk in common stock ownership as a combination of three things; What other liquid asset classes can produce during the same time period, how the stock market does during the time period, and how well your selections do in comparison to those options. Why would professional investors mute long-term returns in a guaranteed way? The answer comes from how you define risk.

Continue Reading


Reblog: Bill Nygren: Value Investing Principles and Approach


Bill Nygren is a fund manager at Oakmark Funds. He is also Chief Investment Officer for U.S. Equities at Harris Associates. He’s particularly well-known for being a value investor who doesn’t fear the technology sector.

This post summarises key takeaways from his talk at Google in December 2017. While he reinforces many core value investing principles, he also challenges us to think differently.

The difference between gambling and investing

A value investor recognizes there are different ways she can put capital at risk and the difference between gambling (negative expected value) and investing in stocks (positive expected value)

Buying stocks like you would buy groceries

Bill observed the way his mother shopped for groceries by buying more of something that was on sale and deferring her purchase of something that wasn’t yet on sale

Smart money is not always smart

He spent two years as a research analyst at Northwestern Mutual Life where he pitched ideas of companies that he found were trading below their asset values. However, the portfolio managers chose not to buy such stocks until after they were recommended by 2-3 Wall Street analysts, by which time the price had moved to above asset values.

Continue Reading


Reblog: IPO Review – TCNS Clothing


Verdict: The Cool and Nice Stock

IPO Snapshot:

TCNS Clothing Co. Limited is entering the primary market on Wednesday 18th July 2018, with an offer for sale (OFS) of up to 1.57 crore equity shares of Rs.2 each by PE investor, promoters, current MD and former employees, all in the price band of Rs. 714 to Rs. 716 per share. Representing 25.63% of the post issue paid-up share capital, total issue size is Rs. 1,125 crore at the upper end of the price band. Issue closes on Friday 20th July and listing is likely on 30th July.

Company Overview:

TCNS Clothing Co. is a New Delhi head quartered branded apparel maker for ethnic women wear, operating 3 brands – W, Aurelia and Wishful, with sales mix of 57:33:8. Its 465 exclusive branded outlets (281 for W, 183 for Aurelia, 1 for Wishful) accounted for approximately 50% of FY18 topline of Rs. 838 crore. Further, products are sold through 1,469 large format stores, 1,522 multi-brand outlets and online/ e-commerce websites, which account for 28%, 11% and 10% of the topline respectively. While design operations are in-house, manufacturing is completely outsourced. The brand outlets, all on long term leases, are either company operated or franchised out. Company plans to open 75-80 new stores each year, to strengthen its brands.

Continue Reading