Reblog: 39 Book Recommendations From Billionaire Charlie Munger that Will Make you Smarter


 

That quote kickstarted my own reading habits and helps me regularly read over 100 books a year.

Charlie Munger is the billionaire business partner of Warren Buffett and the Vice Chairman at Berkshire Hathaway, one of the largest companies in the world. He’s also one of the smartest people on the planet — his lecture on the psychology of human misjudgment is the best 45 minutes you might spend this year.

Over the years Munger’s compiled a list of book recommendations that has served me well. A lot of these books will help you become more valuable by seeing the world for what it really is and gaining unique ideas and insights.

1. Faraday, Maxwell, and the Electromagnetic Field: How Two Men Revolutionized Physics

It’s a combination of scientific biography and explanation of the physics, particularly relating to electricity. It’s just the best book of its kind I have ever read, and I just hugely enjoyed it. Couldn’t put it down. It was a fabulous human achievement. And neither of the writers is a physicist.

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Reblog: Diversification Or Concentration? Quotes From Some Of The Best Investors


“There is one other rule you ought to keep in mind and that is to concentrate, and not only in the Zen sense. Sweet are the uses of diversity, but only if you want to end up in the middle of an average”  Adam Smith, the Money Game 1968

“Statistical analysis shows that security-specific risk is adequately diversified after 14 names in different industries, and the incremental benefit of each additional holding is negligible. We own 18-22 companies to allow us to be amply diversified but have the flexibility to overweight a name or own more than one business within an industry.” Mason Hawkins

“Empirical testing has proved beyond a reasonable doubt that the “riskiness” of a portfolio of 12-15 diverse companies is little greater than one loaded with a hundred or more” Frank Martin

“If you can identify six wonderful businesses, that is all the diversification you need. And you will make a lot of money. And I can guarantee that going into a seventh one instead of putting more money into your first one is gotta be a terrible mistake. Very few people have gotten rich on their seventh best idea. But a lot of people have gotten rich with their best idea. So I would say for anyone working with normal capital who really knows the businesses they have gone into, six is plenty, and I probably have half of what I like best. I don‘t diversify personally. ” Warren Buffett

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Reblog: Greatest Investors of All Time – How Did They Do It and What We Can Learn from Them


There are literally tens of millions of stock market and private investors today. The personal investing revolution has enabled anyone with a few hundred dollars to trade stocks. But we don’t have millions of great investors. Only a select few will ever be bestowed this title. So, how can you try to be one of them? You can emulate the people who were – or still are – the greatest. Below is our list of 8 of the greatest investors of all time; let us know in the comments below if you think we’ve missed out on any important names.

This list was compiled based on inputs from our members of Value Investing Clubs in UK, France, Belgium and Austria, and from our users at our FinTech company CityFALCON. Our focus at the Value Investing Clubs and CityFALCON remains on long-term fundamental investors who are looking to go through research to buy, hold and sell financial assets to generate strong higher than inflation returns.

Warren Buffett

We will just start off with the obvious case: Warren Buffett. Who doesn’t consider him one of the greatest, if not the greatest investor? Born just in time for the Depression (1930), Warren Buffett was born in Omaha, Nebraska, whence he eventually took his nickname “The Oracle of Omaha”.

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Reblog: Mohnish Pabrai’s Approach To Beating The Market


Mohnish Pabrai, managing partner of Pabrai Investment Funds, speaks during the Value Investing Congress in New York. Photographer: Daniel Barry/Bloomberg News

Since inception, Mohnish Pabrai has beat the stock market by triple digit returns. What was the key to his success? Pabrai would argue nothing unexpected or surprising.  In fact, he attributes his massive success to a keen sense of cloning other super-investors like Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger. On the investing podcast, Pabrai discussed a range of topics to help explain his way of thinking and methods for achieving such strong performance.

Preston Pysh: [2:29] You have an IT background that not a lot of people know about. Would you have taken a different career path if you had found value investing first?

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Reblog: Go for the Million!


If you already have a million dollars or more, this blogpost is not for you.

For all others, I’ll cut the bullshit and get to the chase. I am just mighty pissed off.

When you have less than a million dollars –

Please don’t listen to any or all the Gurus who are propagating 16% CAGR, 18% CAGR, 20% CAGR. You know the usual spiel. Say, you have 5 Lakh rupees. Gurus recommend that you should be happy be 18% CAGR or 20% CAGR and over a long period of time (40 years), you would be so rich, that even the rich would be ashamed.

Bullshit.

For all those studies, where you read that if you had invested in quality at any price, and just held on to them for a long period of time (40 years), you would have made enough money to be proud of yourself.

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Reblog: The Evolution Of A Value Manager


The original article appears on valuewalk.com and is available here.

Over the years reading plenty of books on investing and studying many of the world’s greatest investors I’ve come to recognise how truly insightful the combination of Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger really are.

While Warren Buffett cites the book “The Intelligent Investor” as “by far the best book on investing ever written” his style evolved over the years in a large part influenced by Charlie Munger.

“Charlie shoved me in the direction of not just buying bargains, as Ben Graham had taught me.  This was the real impact Charlie had on me.  It took a powerful force to move me on from Graham’s limiting views.  It was the power of Charlie’s mind.  He expanded my horizons”  Warren Buffett

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