Reblog: Calendar Spread Definition – Day Trading Terminology


Calendar spread is an options strategy that allows traders and investors to enter long and short positions simultaneously for the same underlying and strike price but different expiration dates.

Option traders can utilize calendar spreads as a way to get into a long position at a cheaper price by selling the other leg and bringing in a credit. As a result, the option trader has the choice of owning longer-term calls or puts for less money. Keep in mind that this strategy can be used with both calls or puts.

How To Trade A Calendar Spread

Calendar Spread

As said earlier, the calendar spread is an option trading strategy where a trader opens two legs with different expiring dates for the same security. In the picture above, you can see that we are selling the earlier expiration (aka the front month) in January and buying the longer expiration set for February. Your max loss on this trade is your net debit you paid to open the position while your max gain is theoretically unlimited.

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Reblog: Buy To Cover Definition: Day Trading Terminology


Buy to cover is an order type made against a stock with the purpose of closing an existing short position. Traders are required to place the buy order with a broker so as to fulfill the requirements of a margin call or to close a position for a profit.

Short selling is the process of borrowing shares from your broker to sell in the open market with hopes of buying them back at a cheaper price. By initiating a buy-to-cover order, the trader is able to cover the short sale allowing the shares to be returned to the rightful lender.

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Reblog: Trading Terminology By Warrior Trading


Bar Chart Definition: Day Trading Terminology

A bar chart is a graph characterized by a vertical bar and it’s used by technical analysts to learn more about trends. In trading, a single bar is used to represent a single day of trading. As one of the most popular chart type aside from candlesticks, it represents price activity within a given period of time.

As a result, traders and investors use this chart type to spot trends and patterns. What you need to know is that a bar chart is similar to the candlestick. The only difference is that the body of a bar chart is not filled like that of a candlestick.

As the western version of the Japanese candlestick, they help investors and traders to observe the contraction and expansion of different price ranges.

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