Reblog: Learning From Jamie Dimon


There are a number of letters that I look forward to reading each year. Some of them are well known and Buffett’s are, of course, a classic example. There are also others that have added enormous value to my thinking over the years, and that have opened my eyes to many new and varied investment opportunities. They have also helped me spot emerging themes, new ideas, thought processes and mental models. I mentioned Buffett because his 2011 letter is a case in point. In that Buffett recommended reading Jamie Dimon’s annual letters. And it’s little wonder; Buffett has said this about Dimon in the past…

“I think he knows more about markets than probably anybody you could find in the world.” 

Jamie Dimon, the son of a stockbroker, has been at the helm of JP Morgan [and it’s predecessor firm ‘Bank One’] since March 2000. In that time the tangible book value has compounded at 11.8%pa vs 5.2%pa for the S&P500. Not surprisingly, the stock price has followed, delivering a 12.4%pa return vs the S&P500’s 5.2%pa over that period. A cumulative gain of 691% versus 147% for the S&P500. Not bad considering the multitude of challenges that have faced global banks over that period, including the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

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Reblog: What To Do In A Selloff? Avoid Emotion And More


The most important factor which determines if you successfully deal with a selloff is how you are positioned before one. When faced with a correction or a bear market your portfolio’s risk needs to be properly set to your personality, age, goals, savings and overall position in your life. It’s very tempting when starting a portfolio to take more risk when stocks are moving up and less risk when stocks are moving down. However, if you’re investing for the long term, there will be many of both scenarios. You need to visualize how you’d react when you make 20% in a year or lose 30% in 6 months. When deciding on the amount of risk you’re willing to take, one of the most important aspects is to avoid basing your choice on where you think the market will go up or down in the short term. You need to have a baseline plan for all markets to avoid scenarios where you panic. It’s easy to panic when you don’t have a plan in place. If your risk profile is wrong, you will likely underperform. Taking too much risk can cause quick painful losses. If you switch to a more conservative approach after you lost money, it will be difficult to make the money back.

Stay Disciplined

No matter how much you plan or how closely your portfolio matches your risk profile, if you want to go against your plan on a whim of a decision, it’s possible. There can be some circumstances where you need to wait a defined period before you can get your money back, but eventually, you will be able to. You can override your personal financial advisor if you have one and you can take your money out of passive funds at inopportune times if you are making emotionally charged investing decisions. These are all mistakes you can make if you don’t follow through on your discipline. Recognizing you have the freedom to mess up your finances is daunting for some people who aren’t experienced. The key for inexperienced and even experienced investors is to take a methodical approach rather than being reactionary.

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Sensex gains 197 points on Friday; RIL pips TCS to become most valued firm


The benchmark indices ended over 0.5 per cent higher led by a rise in the financial stocks and Reliance Industries (RIL).

The S&P BSE Sensex ended at 35,457, up 197 points (0.56 per cent), while the broader Nifty50 index settled at 10,682, up 66 points (0.62 per cent). In the broader markets, the S&P BSE MidCap index ended flat at 14,998, while the S&P BSE SmallCap slipped 0.4 per cent to end at 14,486.

Among sectoral indices, the Nifty PSU Bank index settled 2 per cent higher led by Oriental Bank of Commerce and Bank of India.

The rupee traded on a firm note on Friday rising to 71.71 per US dollar in intra-day trade, up from its previous close of 71.98 against the greenback.

Shares of RIL on Friday rose 2.7 per cent to Rs 1,127 on the BSE helping the oil-to-telecom major pip Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) to become the most-valued company in terms of market capitalisation. On the BSE, RIL’s market capitalisation was at Rs 7,14,668.54 crore, while India’s largest IT firm by revenue TCS slipped to the second spot with a valuation of Rs 7,06,292.61 crore.

Shares of Rallis India, Deepak Fertilisers & Chemicals, Dixon Technologies (India), Hexaware Technologies, Take Solutions and BASF were among 22 stocks from the S&P BSE Allcap index hitting their respective 52-week lows on Friday in intra-day trade.

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Reblog: 37 Amazing Lessons I Learned About Investing From Jim Cramer


Every day I jot down on yellow legal paper a list of ideas and subjects that I think will be interesting to our subscribers and that I can add value to — topics for future opening missives in my Diary. 

Each morning, at around 4:45, I think about what I will write as the subject of my opener for the day.

I typically contemplate the prior day’s market action and the overnight price changes in the major asset classes and regional markets around the world and I try to come up with something relevant, topical and actionable.

Something on my list, for many moons, is the subject of the lessons I have learned from Jim “El Capitan” Cramer.

Over the years I have written about the contributions that Jim has made and I have defended Jim as well against the wrong-footed criticism that he often faces in his role as a high-profile and visible public figure.

My defence of Jim is not done because I essentially have worked for him over the last two decades. Rather, it is heartfelt and done in the recognition of the contributions that Jim has made since he invented and founded TheStreet. I do this in large part because Jim has been my professor, an important contributor to my investment experience.

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Reblog: Candlestick patterns – 21 easy patterns (and what they mean) Part 3 of 3


In the first part of the post, we looked at Equal open and close, Doji patterns and in the second part, we looked at Short body candles. In today’s post, we will discuss Long body candlestick patterns.

Long body candlestick patterns

candlestick patterns dark cloud cover

Dark Cloud Cover:

Dark cloud cover candlestick patterns indicate an incoming bearish reversal.

A two candle pattern, the first candle is a long green bullish candle.

The next candle opens higher but reverses and declines, the candle then closes below the center of the first candle.

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Sensex slips 79 pts, Nifty ends at 10,585; IT stocks weigh


The benchmark indices ended slightly lower on Friday led by a fall in information technology (IT) and metal stocks.

The S&P BSE Sensex ended at 35,159, down 79 points, while the broader Nifty50 index settled at 10,585, down 13 points.

Among the sectoral indices, the Nifty IT index fell 0.8 per cent weighed by Infosys and Tata Consultancy Services (TCS). The Nifty Metal index slipped 0.9 per cent due to a decline in NMDC. On the other hand, the Nifty Pharma index settled 1.4 per cent higher led by a rise in Sun Pharma.

In stock-specific action, Bharti Airtel fell 2.9 per cent to Rs 297 on the BSE after Moody’s Investors Service placed it’s rating on review for downgrade, following low levels of profitability and expectation of weak cash flow. The stock had fallen as much as 5.21 per cent to Rs 290 on the BSE in intra-day trade.

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Reblog: Candlestick patterns – 21 easy patterns (and what they mean) Part 2 of 3


In the first part of the post, we looked at Equal open and close, Doji patterns. In today’s post, we will discuss Short body candles.

Short body candles.

candlestick patterns long shadow days

Long Shadow candles:

Long shadows are one of the more reliable candlestick patterns.

Candles with a long top shadow and short lower shadow show us that buyers dominate the market, these can lead to or continue a bull run in prices.

On the other end.

Candles with a long lower shadow and short upper shadow show us that sellers dominate the market and these candles can lead to or continue a bear run in prices.

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Reblog: Candlestick patterns – 21 easy patterns (and what they mean) Part 1 of 3


Here’s the deal, learning just a few key candlestick patterns WILL improve your ability to recognize trading opportunities and enter better trades! The Japanese have been using these patterns for centuries, to trade rice of all things! So, there is a rich history to the art of candlestick trading. Candlestick patterns are an integral part of technical analysis, candlestick patterns emerge because human actions and reactions are patterned and constantly replicate and are captured in the formation of the candles. So, by recognising these patterns and applying the lessons that the patterns teach, can and does yield results in your trading!

And isn’t that the aim of trading?

Now I know what your thinking!

BUT!

Don’t think of this as a list to memorize.

Think of this as a guide that you jump in and out of, whenever you need to jog your memory!

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Sensex surges 580 points on Friday on strong Asian cues; auto, banks rally


The benchmark indices settled over 1.5 per cent higher on Friday led by a sharp rise in automobile stocks amid a jump in the Asian markets which rose as China and the United States expressed optimism about resolving their bruising trade war.

The S&P BSE Sensex ended at 35,012, up 580 points (up 1.8 per cent), while the broader Nifty50 index settled at 10,553, up 173 points (up 1.7 per cent). The indices ended over 5 per cent higher this week, making it the biggest weekly gain since May 2016.

Among the sectoral indices, Nifty Auto index rose 4.2 per cent led by a rise in Maruti Suzuki, Tata Motors and Hero MotoCorp. The Nifty Bank index, too, ended 1.5 per cent led by IndusInd Bank and Axis Bank.

In stocks, the oil and gas companies rallied led by BPCL which rose 6.4 per cent to Rs 301 on the BSE while IOC ended nearly 5 per cent higher at Rs 148.

The rupee firmed against the US dollar, reclaiming the 72-per-dollar levels. The Indian currency rose to 72.53 against the greenback in intra-day trade, up from its previous close of 73.45 per dollar.

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